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Temperature invariant infrared filter

patent

Our patent for a ‘Temperature invariant infrared filter’ has recently been published on the UK Intellectual Property Office website

Temperature invariant infrared filter

T Jones, N Lawrence, G J Hawkins, R E Sherwood, K Djotni

British Patent No. GB 2530099 A (2016)

A temperature invariant narrow bandpass filter 5 to transmit mid-infrared radiation that may be used in a mid-infrared sensor for monitoring a species, which may be a component of a fluid or a solid material. The filter has a substrate 14, a first stack deposited on the substrate, a cavity 16 deposited on the first stack and a second stack deposited on the cavity. The first and second stacks are made from alternating high 10 and low 12 refractive index materials, and the cavity is a low refractive index material. By providing a high ratio of low refractive index material in the filter with respective to high refractive index material, the filter is configured so that wavelength transmission remains constant with varying temperature. The high refractive index material has a refractive index that decreases with temperature and the cavity is at least three full wavelengths or three half wavelengths of the transmission wavelength or the narrow band of transmission wavelengths.

UK Intellectual Property Office Patent Document

Cooled optical filters for Q-band infrared astronomy (15-40µm)

Edinburgh-Paper

Our latest paper entitled ‘Cooled optical filters for Q-band infrared astronomy (15-40µm)’ has just been published at the SPIE Astronomical Telescopes & Instrumentation conference (26 June – 1 July 2016).

Cooled optical filters for Q-band infrared astronomy (15-40µm)

G J Hawkins, R E Sherwood, K Djotni, T M Threadgold

SPIE Astronomical Telescopes & Instrumentation conference, Advances in Optical and Mechanical Technologies for Telescopes and Instrumentation, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, 26 June – 1 July (2016)

With a growing interest in mid- and far-infrared astronomy using cooled imaging and spectrometer instruments in high-altitude observatories and spaceflight telescopes, it is becoming increasingly important to characterise and assess the spectral performance of cooled multilayer filters across the Q-band atmospheric window. This region contains spectral features emitted by many astrophysical phenomena and objects fundamental to circumstellar and planetary formation theories. However extending interference filtering to isolate radiation at progressively longer wavelengths and improve photometric accuracy is an area of ongoing and challenging thin-film research. We have successfully fabricated cooled bandpass and edge filters with high durability for operation across the 15-30µm Q-band region. In this paper we describe the rationale for selection of optical materials and properties of fabricated thin-film coatings for this region, together with FTIR spectral measurements and assessment of environmental durability.

DOI: 10.1117/12.2231669

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Explore the history, anatomy and intelligence of robots and test drive robots using exciting simulations.

Further information: http://www.reading.ac.uk/sse/mooc/sse-begin-robotics.aspx

Infrared optical coatings for the EarthCARE Multispectral Imager

Infrared optical coatings for the EarthCARE Multispectral Imager

Our latest paper entitled ‘Infrared optical coatings for the EarthCARE Multispectral Imager’ has just been published in the Optical Society of America, Applied Optics journal.

The paper is open access so anyone can download a copy if they wish.

Infrared optical coatings for the EarthCARE Multispectral Imager

G J Hawkins, D Woods, R E Sherwood, K Djotni

Applied Optics, Vol. 53, Issue 27, pp. 6983-6992 (2014)

The Earth Cloud, Aerosol and Radiation Explorer mission (EarthCARE) Multispectral Imager (MSI) is a radiometric instrument designed to provide the imaging of the atmospheric cloud cover and the cloud top surface temperature from a sun-synchronous low Earth orbit. The MSI forms part of a suite of four instruments destined to support the European Space Agency Living Planet mission on-board the EarthCARE satellite payload to be launched in 2016, whose synergy will be used to construct three-dimensional scenes, textures and temperatures of atmospheric clouds and aerosols. The MSI instrument contains seven channels: four solar channels to measure visible and short-wave infrared wavelengths, and three channels to measure infrared thermal emission. In this paper, we describe the optical layout of the infrared instrument channels, thin-film multilayer designs, the coating deposition method and the spectral system throughput for the bandpass interference filters, dichroic beam splitters, lenses and mirror coatings to discriminate wavelengths at 8.8, 10.8, & 12.0 µm. The rationale for the selection of thin-film materials, spectral measurement technique, and environmental testing performance are also presented.

DOI: 10.1364/AO.53.006983 | Download the full version

Liftoff for Reading filters on board TechDemoSat-1 satellite

TechDemoSat-LaunchPrecision optical components developed by the Infrared Multilayer Laboratory in the School of Systems Engineering were successfully launched by a Soyuz 2-1B rocket at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The infrared optical filters form a key part of the Compact Modular Sounder (CMS) instrument on board the TechDemoSat-1 satellite.

TechDemoSat-1 is a high technology satellite built by Surrey Satellite Technology in conjunction with Oxford University Atmospheric Physics Department, the UK Space Agency and a number of industry partners to create a spacecraft for the demonstration of innovative technology for scientific and commercial applications in spaceflight. The CMS instrument is a modular infrared remote sensing radiometer unit, designed to easily mix and match subsystems and fly multiple versions on platforms at low cost by tailoring the instrument to the specific needs of science and industry.

Dr Gary Hawkins at the University of Reading Infrared Multilayer Laboratory, has been responsible for the design and manufacture of the high precision narrow-bandpass infrared filters which are used to define the atmospheric gas measurements of the instrument.

TechDemoSat-1 Liftoff

About the Laboratory

The , part of the School of Systems Engineering, is exclusively engaged in the research, development and supply of specialist high-quality infrared optics; ranging from coatings for single optical components, to the complete spectral design and manufacture of coatings for complex infrared space-flight atmospheric sensing and ground based astronomical instruments.

The laboratory has established and maintained a long heritage of research, and an internationally renowned reputation as experts at the forefront of thin-film engineering of optical coatings for deployment in state-of-the-art astronomy and planetary remote-sensing instrumentation. The laboratory has been actively involved with projects for development of unique infrared optical components for instruments including ESA’s Living Planet EarthCARE Multi-Spectral Imager (MSI), ESA GMES Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR), NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), NASA/ESA JWST Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) and the ISRO SAC Indian National Satellite System (INSAT-3D) radiometer programmes. These missions are destined to provide global observations of land, ocean and atmospheric monitoring for use in meteorological theories on climate change, and the study of astrophysical properties of stars and other planetary objects.

Further information: http://www.reading.ac.uk/infrared/news/ir-newsarticle-2014-07-09.aspx

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Further information: http://www.reading.ac.uk/sse/mooc/sse-begin-programming.aspx

University of Reading a key component in India’s advanced weather satellite

V214 Transfert Lanceur en ZL le 24/07/2013Precision optical components developed by the Infrared Multilayer Laboratory at the University of Reading installed on the INSAT-3D meteorological satellite have just been launched by an Ariane 5 rocket from the Spaceport in French Guiana. The infrared optical filters form a key part of the imager and sounder on the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) INSAT-3D meteorological satellite, comprising a six channel imaging radiometer designed to measure radiant and solar reflected energy from areas sampled on the Earth and a nineteen channel high resolution infrared sounder to measure vertical temperature profiles, humidity, surface and cloud top temperatures, and ozone distribution.

INSAT-3D is one of three satellites under development by ISRO exclusively to improve domestic weather forecasting and track cyclones and monsoons originating from the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea.

The filters project, led by Dr Gary Hawkins at the University of Reading together with NDC Infrared Engineering Ltd., have been responsible for the design and manufacture of the narrow-bandpass infrared filters defining the spectral band definition of the instrument. The payload instruments are required to operate for a lifetime of 7 years after launch.

INSAT-3D Liftoff

About the Laboratory

The , part of the School of Systems Engineering, is exclusively engaged in the research, development and supply of specialist high-quality infrared optics; ranging from coatings for single optical components, to the complete spectral design and manufacture of coatings for complex infrared space-flight atmospheric sensing and ground based astronomical instruments.

The laboratory has established and maintained a long heritage of research, and an internationally renowned reputation as experts at the forefront of thin-film engineering of optical coatings for deployment in state-of-the-art astronomy and planetary remote-sensing instrumentation. The laboratory has been actively involved with projects for development of unique infrared optical components for instruments including ESA’s Living Planet EarthCARE Multi-Spectral Imager (MSI), ESA GMES Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR), NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), NASA/ESA JWST Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) and the ISRO SAC Indian National Satellite System (INSAT-3D) radiometer programmes. These missions are destined to provide global observations of land, ocean and atmospheric monitoring for use in meteorological theories on climate change, and the study of astrophysical properties of stars and other planetary objects.

Further information: http://www.reading.ac.uk/infrared/news/ir-newsarticle-2013-07-26.aspx

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ESTEC James Webb Space Telescope Significant Achievement Award

I’ve been presented with a second certificate, this time from the European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) for my contributions to the Mid Infra-Red Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Observatory.

ESTEC JWST Significant Achievement Award

On the occasion of the delivery of the MIRI Optical System to NASA, the European Space Agency presents the James Webb Space Telescope Significant Achievement Award to Richard Sherwood, in recognition of his extraordinary contribution to the JWST mission.

UKATC James Webb Space Telescope Significant Achievement Award

I’ve been presented with certificate from the Science & Technology Facilities Council, UK Astronomy Technology Centre for my contributions to the Mid Infra-Red Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Observatory.

UKATC JWST Significant Achievement Award

The James Webb Space Telescope Significant Achievement Award is presented to Richard Sherwood for your significant contribution to the Mid Infra-Red Instrument (MIRI) on the JWST Observatory delivered May 2012.

CAVE Virtual Environment

I really should try and see if I can get Skyrim running on this thing… :)

The CAVE, part of the at the School of Systems Engineering’s Visualisation and Interactive Technology Centre, is a £2 million state-of-the-art virtual environment that allows users to walk into a computer-generated world. It is part of the School of Systems Engineering’s Visualisation and Interactive Technology Centre. The CAVE enables users to experience, see and interact with large built environments, visualise complex data sets, such as MRI images, or provide immersive medical training or treatment in a controlled, safe setting.